It’s Not About the Bunny

"I have been crucified with Christ: and I myself no longer live, but Christ lives in me.  And the real life I now have within this body is a result of my trusting in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me."  Galatians 2:20

Most of us have nothing against bunnies. They're adorable. Fluffy. Cute. Unassuming.

And, I love a chocolate bunny this time of year as much as the next person (maybe more).

But Easter isn't about the bunny.  In fact, it's really not fair to place bunnies in such a position as to detract or distract in any way from the real meaning of Easter—for it is the story of Easter that embodies and completes the hope of every Christian who has ever lived or ever will live.

This is the story of Easter.  It is found in the gospels:  Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, and John 19.

Once upon a time, the Son of God came to earth as a baby, lived a sinless life, and showed the world a love that was beyond their comprehension.  It was a love greater than anything they had ever seen before.  This love was so amazing and so misunderstood that evil people in the world sought to destroy it.   And they thought they succeeded.

But they were wrong.

The Messiah, the Savior of the World, suffered and died, and on the third day He rose from the dead.

Why did He do it?  This Scripture tells us the reason why.  It is the simple and beautiful message of the cross: “There is forgiveness of sins for all who repent” (Luke 24:47).

This Scripture also tells us that the message will be proclaimed to all the nations.

Do you believe in Jesus?  Have you repented of sin?  Have you told the story?  It isn't a fish tale; it is a fisherman's tale.  A man came—a perfect, sinless man—having nothing but love for all humanity.  And, this man taught us how to become fishers of men.  He taught us how to live, and He taught us how to love.

May we continue to tell the miraculous story of Easter that others might know the real life, the real love we find in Jesus Christ.

He is Risen!

Goodnight, Runners.


Comments